Homes England and Muse team up to accelerate delivery of former Thames Valley University site

24.03.23 3 min read by Ryan Devlin

Homes England – the government’s housing and regeneration agency – has bought the former Thames Valley University site from Slough Borough Council, and has teamed up with us to accelerate the creation of the place-changing North West Quadrant (NWQ).

We’ve been the council’s partner in the Slough Urban Renewal joint venture for the past decade, and have been working on the NWQ site for a number of years.

This new neighbourhood, which is a key site in the town centre, will continue the major positive change to the community and the local economy that we’ve created through the our partnership over the years. NWQ will deliver a range of mixed-tenure homes to suit all lifestyles, places to work, alongside a wealth of supporting amenities, set within beautifully curated public spaces.

Alongside Homes England, we’re looking forward to engaging in an extensive engagement programme that’s anticipated to start in the Summer, which will inform a revised, community-focused masterplan.

Chris Scott, development director, said:

As a business, we’re committed to finding sustainable solutions to deliver place-changing regeneration that benefits communities across the UK in any way we can. This deal in Slough with Homes England is a perfect example of how strong partnerships between the public and private sector, can overcome challenges to achieve shared goals.”
For the past decade, through our Slough Urban Renewal joint venture, we have already successfully created much-needed affordable homes and a number of amenities, such as schools, leisure and sporting facilities in the town. We’ve also secured planning on the Stoke Wharf and Montem Lane sites, which will bring forward an additional 500 mixed-tenure homes.”
Slough’s a fantastic town, rich in history, and we’re delighted to reach an important milestone that’s secured the future of the North West Quadrant and we look forward to engaging with the local community and key stakeholders again soon.”

Ken Glendinning, national director – acquisitions and partnering at Homes England, said: “The acquisition of the former Thames Valley University site is an important milestone in the creation of the North West Quadrant destination.

“Our role is to connect local places and the private sector to support the creation of new, quality homes and we’re pleased to build on our long-standing partnership with Muse to bring forward this key town centre site.”

Council leader, James Swindlehurst said: “the council has spent months negotiating the details of this successful sale to Homes England of the former TVU site. As a specialist regeneration organisation Homes England already has existing projects it has completed with Muse, so they will be able to hit the ground running to move forward the redevelopment of this major town centre site.

“The funding that they bring to the project will ensure all the council’s key objectives in creating a new neighbourhood with new town centre amenities will be carried forward and delivered by a specialist regeneration partnership with a strong track record of transforming large and complex sites. I am delighted we have agreed this multi-million pound sale, the scale of which significantly improves the council’s financial position whilst ensuring our key priorities are delivered by a trusted and respected specialist partner on this site.”

Discover More

stories

What’s in a place name?

stories

New illustrations bring Bradford’s City Village to life

stories

Transformative masterplan for Solihull Town Centre presented at UKREiiF

stories

Lewisham Gateway Guest Blog: Gareth Blacker

stories

Eden opens for business

stories

Muse recognised for decade of gold-standard culture

stories

UKREiiF: why innovation and affordable homes are at the top of our agenda

stories

Supporting innovation in Salford

stories

ECF joins Homes England Delivery Partner Framework to accelerate delivery

stories

How new procurement rules and frameworks could unlock complex urban regeneration